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Days 1, 2 and 3 (12 Hours Construction Time)


(Day1 - 1 1/2 hours) The Hull for this project requires two 4'x16' panels. I started by Scarfing 4'x8' sheets of 3/8 BS 6566 plywood together to get the proper length panels. (Day 2 - 6 Hours) After the epoxy has cured I sanded the scarf joints and lofted the hull panels.


Plywood epoxy stitch and glue design


After the panels have been cut to shape I did the final fairing with a block plane. The bottom panels get drilled and stitched down the keel line. On the ends the stitches are about 4" apart and the rest of the stitching about 8" to 10" apart. The side panels also get drilled for stitching along the chine. The bottom panel get spread apart and the side panels can now get stitched. It is a two person job with one person holding the panel and the other drilling and tying wires. Start stitching the side panels from the bow working aft.


Plywood epoxy stitch and glue design


After the panels are all stitched together the forward bulkhead and transom get screwed into place. I needed to trim the bulkheads a bit to get them to fit without pushing the side panels out. When fastening with screws tighten until contact is made and back it off a bit, they are only temporary clamps for the epoxy and glass. I prefer to tab and glass the hull without any of the inside bulkheads in place. To do this you need locate where the bulkheads go and put in spreaders to the proper width. If the panels are cut properly and the beam of the boat is correct, then hull will have the proper shape. I don't necessarily worry about leveling the hull fore and aft but is does need to be leveled side to side which is easy to do by using the locations marked for the bulkheads. When the hull "straight" it can be tabbed. I does not hurt to add 2"x2" pieces of 6 oz cloth between the stitches to make the joints a bit stronger after the wires are pulled.


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(Day 3 - 3.5 Hours) After the tabbing has cured the wires can be pulled and the surfaces sanded smooth. The hull is fairly fragile at this point because I did not add glass patches to the fillets so I have to be careful not to stress the joints to much. All the joints are filleted and glass is applied. I used a glass schedule of two 8" strips of 6 oz cloth, one 6" strip of 12 oz biax and one 4" strip of 12 oz biax (all the inside joints will glassed this way). For more detailed information on filleting and glassing Click Here. After the glassing is done the hull is leveled again.


Plywood epoxy stitch and glue design



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